The hidden oil patterns on bowling lanes

Author channel Vox   1 год. назад
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Every bowling lane has a hidden oil pattern. In this episode of Vox Almanac, Phil Edwards finds out what that means. Follow Phil Edwards and Vox Almanac on Facebook for more: https://www.facebook.com/philedwardsinc1/

Every lane has a pattern. In this episode of Vox Almanac, Phil Edwards explores how they change the game.

Bowling isn’t just about a great ball and good form — if you want to understand the sport, you have to understand the lane.

Every bowling lane, including the one in your neighborhood alley, is coated with an oil pattern to protect the wood. But these patterns aren’t just for protection — the way in which oil is applied to the lane can affect the speed and direction of your ball.

These patterns are so important that recreational bowlers and professional bowlers bowl on vastly different patterns — the Professional Bowlers Association (PBA) even classifies the patterns it uses in tournaments.

Phil Edwards met with professional bowler Parker Bohn III at his childhood bowling alley, Howell Lanes in Howell, New Jersey. He guided Phli through the complex strategy a pro bowler uses when encountering different oil patterns. Not only do they have to assess which pattern is in use, but they also have to judge how that pattern changes as the oil shifts and slides over the day. Knowing how to play a specific lane can be the difference between a title and second place.

But these patterns aren’t just for the pros — they’re relevant to recreational bowlers as well. Watch the video to see how you can use these patterns to step up your game.

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Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app.

Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE
Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO

Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app.

Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE
Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

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